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Character in Real Life - One-Minute Testimonials

CREATIVITY – A One-Minute Testimonial Announcement
Faith Committee, Character Council of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky

Contributed from Encyclopedia of 15,000 Illustrations

WHY TYNDALE TRANSLATED BIBLE

One of the heroes of the story of the publication and spread of the Bible is William Tyndale. He lived in England in the 16th century, a time when there was such evil even amongst the church leaders of his day. History informs us that of 308 clergy in one diocese, 40 did not know the Lord’s Prayer and 168 did not know the Ten Commandments.

Tyndale asked permission of the Bishop of London to make a translation of the Bible but was refused. To another churchman, Tyndale said: “If God spares my life, before many years I will cause a boy that drives a plow to know more of the Scriptures than you do.”

Blocked in his efforts in England, he went to Germany. There he began his work of translation and in the year 1525 published two editions of the New Testament which were then smuggled into England. To Tyndale we owe the first printed edition of the New Testament in English.

This Bible became instantly popular and perhaps 15,000 copies were circulated, although the authorities tried to destroy them by public burnings. Sometime later, Tyndale himself was caught and burned at the stake. His dying words were: “Lord, open the King of England’s eyes.”

—Eugene A. Hessel

[Reproduced with permission from Encylopedia of 15,000 Illustrations, by Paul Lee Tan, Communications, Inc., Dallas, TX, 1998, #833]

This material is published by the Faith Committee of the Character Council of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Reproduction and Adaptation is encouraged.

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